Page 242 - Memorials-of-Rugbeians-who-fell-in-the-Great-War-Volume-VI

Basic HTML Version

CAPTAIN F. H.
B.
SELOUS,
M.C.
School House
THE QUEEN'S (ROYAL WEST SURREY) REGIMENT AND
ROYAL FLYING CORPS
FREDERICK HATHERLEY BRUCE SELOUS was the eldest son of Captain
F. C. Selous, D.S.O., The Royal Fusiliers (O.R.,
1866-68),
of Heatherside,
Worplesdon, Surrey, and of Gladys Selous.
He entered the School in
1912
and left in
1915.
He was in the XV in
191
3 and
1914.,
and captained it in his last football term, and was in the
Running VIII in
1915.
He entered the R.M.C., Sandhurst, in September,
1915,
and while there he was made Under-Officer of his Company, and
won the seven miles steeplechase.
On leaving Sandhurst in April,
1916,
he was gazetted to The Queen's,
and attached to the Royal Flying Corps. After a little over three months'
training he went to the Front in July,
1916,
and saw nine months' service
there. In March,
1917,
he was gazetted Flight-Commander, and in
May was awarded the Italian Silver Medal for Military Valour
cc
for
distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign."
He returned to England in April,
1917,
and was employed in instructing
at the Central Flying School, Upavon. In June,
1917,
he was awarded the
Military Cross
cc
for distinguished service in the Field," and left for France
in September. He was killed in action, whilst leading his Flight over the
German lines on the Menin Road near Roulers, on January 4th,
1918,
the
anniversary of the death of his father, who was killed in action in East
Africa on January 4th,
1917.
Age
19.
A brother Officer sent the following account of his death :-
"I was up at
15,000
feet over the German lines on January 4th
111
company with my Squadron leader, Captain Selous. All at once both wings
of his aeroplane suddenly collapsed and the machine fell like a stone to the
earth. We are all terribly upset at this, as he was idolized by us all."
The Major commanding No.
60
Squadron wrote:-
cc
I have only commanded this Squadron for a week, but during that
time I have got to know and appreciate your son both as a soldier and as
a friend. It is a severe blow to the Squadron to lose him, as he was absolutely
loved by Officers and men alike. In fact his popularity extended to much
greater areas than his own aerodrome. In the short week that I have known
him I have been struck with the courage and keenness of your son, always
ready for his job, and always going about his work with the cheeriest and
happiest of smiles. He was simply the life and soul of the Mess, and I am
sure that hereditary courage and charm were never more clearly defined."
The record of his father is given in Vol. IV of these Memorials.
242