Page 129 - The-History-of-the-Lancashire-Fusiliers-1914-1918-Volume-I

Basic HTML Version

102
THE LANCASHIRE FUSILIER ,
1914-1918
1St Lancashire Fusiliers ...
2nd Lancashire Fusiliers
1st/5th Lancashire Fusiliers
1st/6th Lancashire Fusiliers
9th Lancashire Fusiliers
10th Lancashire Fusiliers
IIth Lancashire Fusiliers
12th Lancashire Fusiliers
15th Lancashire Fusiliers
16th Lancashire Fusiliers
18th Lancashire Fusiliers
19th Lancashire Fusiliers
20th Lancashire Fusiliers
Royal Engineers, British Expeditionary Force
British Expeditionary Force (unit unknown)
Mediterranean Expeditionary Force (unit
unknown)
2,028
1,786
So
7
0
62 9
194
65
7
0
45
60
80
16
52
26
2,655
49
2
Between 23rd August, 1916, and 7th November, 1918, it sent a total
of 15,229 other ranks overseas in drafts; while between 26th May,
1917, and 14th December, 1918, it sent out in all 698 officers. These
figures include many of all ranks who went overseas again after
coming home wounded or sick. Throughout the greater pact of the
war, the battalion was commanded by Colonel The Earl of West–
morland, A.D.C., who was made a Commander of the Order of the
British Empire for his valuable work in which he received loyal and
much appreciated support from his Countess.
4TH BATTALION
A Special Reserve battalion, like the 3rd, the 4th Battalion moved
from Bury to Barrow-in-Furness, in Lancashire, on 8th August, 1914,
at a strength of 12 officers and 371 other ranks, and soon came under
the command of Colonel
J.
Aspinall Turner, who remained with it
until IIth June, 1918, when he was succeeded by Lieutenant–
Colonel E. U. Bradbridge and was appointed Honorary Colonel of
the unit. At first it was so fully occupied with guard duties at
Vickers Armstrong's shipbuilding yards and with various garrison
duties that little training was possible. H.ecruits arrived so fast and
uniforms so slowly that out of a strength of 1,500 towards the end of
August, 1914, only about 700 were in uniform. The work of the
battalion staff was not made easier by the fact that parties of
recruits arriving from Bury-in plain clothes, of course-often
brought another 25 per cent. of "hangers-on" with them.
Soon after the Battle of Le Cateau, however, the strength of the
4th Battalion came down to more manageable proportions owing to
the despatch overseas of a large draft, though it absorbed all its
trained officers, N.C.Os. and men. Their loss as instructors was later
made good by the return of officers from France; and realistic