Page 278 - The-History-of-the-Lancashire-Fusiliers-1914-1918-Volume-I

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THIRD BATTLE OF YPRES-BATTLE OF CAMBRAl
247
right quarters, a very fine achievement when company head–
quarters were
in
unmarked shell holes and nobody could
be
expected
to know their whereabouts or direct a runner to them. Stockton was
also very useful later in the operation in guiding ration parties from
the rear to the troops in the line. Corporal T. Lancashire, the
medical officer's assistant, seemed to bear a charmed life as he
walked about in search of wounded, quite indifferent to all bullets.
The battalion spent the nigh t of gth/lOth October in the positions
it had won. The conditions were very bad. The shell holes were
half filled with water, the men had no cover and it was bitterly cold.
Fortunately the depression spread to both sides and there was no
activity during the night. But the casualties had not ended. At
about 2 a.m. Major Watkins was hit by a stray bullet through the
right arm and had to leave his headquarters, though he was back
again with the battalion within a fortnight. The adjutant, Captain
G. C. Martin, M.C., assumed command, but four hours later he was
hit by a piece of shrapnel and was compelled to go to hospital. Clarke
then took command, with Second-Lieutenant
R.
Gilmour as his
adjutant. There were no counter-attacks during loth October, but
German snipers were very active. The battalion was relieved that
night and it was due to Clarke's personal initiative and energy that
the process was carried out without a hitch. The troops had been
amazingly cheerful throughout the operation and were in good heart
when they reached Redan Camp, near Brielen, early on 11th October.
At 5 p .m. next day the battalion entrained at Elverdinghe and
detrained two hours later at Proven, whence they marched to what
one officer described as " probably the muddiest camp the battalion
had ever been in."
The medical officer, Captain C.
R. R.
Huxtable, M.C., had once
more shown a complete disregard of his personal safety in the
discharge of his duties, and he was awarded a bar to his decoration.
Captains S. Clarke and
J.
Judd received the Military Cross, while
the Distinguished Conduct Medal was given to Serjeants C. A.
Watch and W. Sidlow and to Corporals F. G. Deeley and E. Stockton.
The good work of the following was recognized by the grant of the
Military Medal :-
Serj eant W. Evans.
S"rjeant
J.
Leonard.
Corporal T. Lancashire.
Private R. Ainscow.
Private C. Breen.
Private A. Davies.
Private G. Hobden.
Private C. Kirk .
Serjeant G. B. A. Lawes.
Serjeant
J.
Shaw.
Corporal F. Nicholson.
Private
J.
H. Booth.
Private H . W. Gaby.
Private D.
J
unes.
Private
J.
Liles.
Private
J.
A. Prior.
In addition, Lance-Corporal G. Brown, M.M., a stretcher-bearer, was
awarded a bar to the Military Medal. The battalion's casualties were
3 officers and 33 other ranks killed, 8 officers and 126 other ranks
wounded and 1 officer and 41' other ranks missing.
I.