Page 353 - The-History-of-the-Lancashire-Fusiliers-1914-1918-Volume-I

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THE LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS,
I9I4-1918
After this the attacks ceased for the day. They were renewed the
next day, 30th March, with great determination but no better
success. On the night 30th/3Ist March the battalion was relieved
by the King's Own and withdrew into support in Missouri, Mississippi
and Effie Trenches, about one thousand yards in rear of the positions
they had so splendidly held.
During the three days' fighting the battalion lost 2 officers and
I6 other ranks killed, 2 officers and 87 other ranks wounded and I
officer and I20 other ranks missing. Of the latter, many were
known to have been wounded or killed and almost all belonged to
the gallant "A" Company. The decorations awarded to the battalion
were as follows :-
Victoria Cross
Second-Lieutenant B. M. Cassidy.
Distingui shed Seroice Order
Lieutenant-Colonel J. W. Watkins, M.C.
Military Cross
Captain G. N. Stange.
Second-Lieutenant A. Howarth.
Distinguished Conduct Medal
Company Serjeant-Major E.
A.
North.
Company Serjeant-Major J. Baines.
Corporal G. L. Clayton.
Lance-Corporal H. Airey.
Private W. H. Roscoe.
Military Medal
Serjeant A. Bryan.
Lance-Corporal F. T. Haworth.
Lance-Corporal
R.
Sladdin.
Private H. Blackledge.
Private J. J esse.
Private T. Jones.
Private H . C. Pontet.
Private
R.
Woo1s.
Corporal A. Carter.
Lance-Corporal
R.
Kenyon.
Private
J.
Bennett.
Private W. Booth.
Private T. Johnson.
Private T. Lackey.
Private A. Walker.
Private S. Wood.
Private E. J. Wooldridge.
A Typical Episode of the March Retreat
It
will have been appreciated from the descriptions given earlier in
this chapter of parts of the operations at the end of March, 19I8,
that the casualties were so heavy that complete units were some–
times wiped out, that there was considerable confusion and
inevitable loss of contact and control, and that dangerous gaps in
the line frequently occurred. As an example of the expedients to
which the authorities had to resort in filling those gaps may be quoted
the experiences of Major F. R. Logan, of the ISt Battalion, who held
the appointment of Chief Instructor of the Fifth Army Musketry
School when the German offensive opened.
He was ordered to take his permanent staff up to the scene of
operations, together with the staff from several other schools. With
this motley party, he filled a gap
in
the line near Hamel, and
defended a bridge until he was nearly surrounded, thus enabling a
casualty clearing station behind
him
to be evacuated. He then
extricated his party and withdrew through the marshes near the