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THE LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS, I914-I9I8
of the eastern arm of the Forest of Nieppe.
It
was not long before
the battalion showed that it was Ha chip of the old block." For
on 6th August a daylight patrol of a serjeant and five men under
Lieutenant W. Anderson, M.C., surprised and captured a machine
gun and five prisoners, who furnished valuable identifications. Next
day a strong party under Captain J. Brown and Lieutenant P.
Farrell, M.C., captured several prisoners and some ground in the
centre of the battalion's sector, though unfortunately Farrell was
wounded and taken prisoner. The battalion received the con–
gratulations of the divisional and brigade commanders for its good
start; and the following awards were made :-
Ba1'
to
Milita1'Y C1'OSS
Lieutenant W. Anderson, M.C.
Milita1'y C1'OSS
Captain
J.
Brown.
Milita1'Y Medal
Serjeant P. Corrigan.
Serjeant W. Mattbews.
Private
J.
Dow.
Private W. R. Richards.
Private
J.
Naughton.
THE START OF THE RETURN JOURNEY
"AMIENS"
15th and 16th Battalions
The 8th August, I9I8, has been called "the black day of the
German Army"; for it saw the launching of the first of a series of
attacks, some big, some small, on the British front which continued
almost without pause until the Germans were compelled to ask for
the armistice which came into force at n a.m. on nth November,
l5TH AND
I9I8. The I5th and I6th Battalions were soon involved and found
16TH
themselves in the country through which they had followed the
BNS.
German retirement-voluntary
in
that case-to the Hindenburg
Line in March, I9I7. They moved down from the Ypres district on
7th August, I9I8, detraining at Hangest-sur-Somme. On 8th
August they were taken in lorries to Domart and Boves respectively
and were in reserve to the Canadians during their famous attack
south-east of Amiens. The next day the battalions marched through
the captured territory to Beaucourt-en-Santerre.
At 4 a.m. on lOth August they advanced to Bouchoir, which was
to be the starting point of an attack with Damery Wood as its
objective. The I5th Battalion (Lieutenant-Colonel H.
K.
Utterson,
D.S.O.) was in the leading wave with the I6th Battalion (Major
E. W. P. Uniacke, D.S.O., King- Edward's Horse, in temporary
command) eight hundred yards behind on a frontage of 2,300 yards.
The attack began at 8 a.m.; at 8.25 a.m. the I5th Battalion
and the Canadians with them captured Le Quesnoy-en-Santerre
and a wood close to it known as "Wood 99." Unfortunately,
a German machine gun in the latter was overlooked and Major