Page 441 - The-History-of-the-Lancashire-Fusiliers-1914-1918-Volume-I

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408
THE LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS,
I9I4-I9I8
while two platoons of "A" Company under Second-Lieutenant W. E.
Ashley were put at Howarth's disposal for use as he thought fit.
Orchard's runner, Private
R.
Boyd, did very good work during the
attack: though he had been badly shaken and was suffering from
gas, he refused to leave his officer and was able to bring back the
news of the failure of the German attempts. Two more attempts on
the posts were made during the night but without success. On the
other hand, "C" Company established three posts across the brook,
being relieved later by Ashley's two platoons. Throughout the 6th
the Germans continued to shell the forward positions, seriously
wounding Blore. That evening the battalion was relieved and
marched back to Battery Valley, where it found waiting for it
warm messages of congratulation from the Corps, Divisional and
Brigade Commanders on the gallantry and endurance of all concerned.
In spite of the
~eavy
shelling, the casualties during these four days
had amounted to no more than one officer wounded, two men killed
and about twelve wounded. The rewards given for this operation
were :-
Bar to Military Cross
Captain A. Howarth, M.C.
J4ilitary Cross
Second-Lieutenant D . Blore.
Distinguished Condttct
,'vI
edal
Corporal P. Beggs.
Private T. Lackey,
:\1.:\1.
Serjeant G. E . Williams.
Lance-Corporal E. Hirst.
Private
J .
S. Bates.
Private
R.
Boyd .
Jfilitary Medals
Corporal H. Howarth.
Private T. S. Beardmore.
Private A. Birchall .
Private
J.
Taylor.
THE RIGHT MOVES AS WELL
"CAMBRAI, 1918," "H1NDENBURG LINE," "SELLE"
2nd, 1st/5th, 6th, 1st/7th, 1st/8th, 10th and 19th Battalions
The sort of lodgement which has just been described, repeated
elsewhere, had the effect of loosening the Germans' hold on their
positions. The month of October, 1918, saw the enemy retiring on
almost the whole of his front, with the intention (not always
achieved) of standing where he chose. His withdrawal brought the
Allied armies into types of scenery that had long been denied them.
For the first time for many months, troops accustomed to the
desolation of the Hindenburg Line saw untouched fields and houses
-and civilians who gave them the warmest possible welcome.
It
was near the right of the British line that battalions of the Regiment
10TH
EN.
first became engaged during that month, beginning with the lOth
Battalion (Lieutenant-Colonel
R.
E. Cotton, D.S.O.), which, after
its fight near Gouzeaucourt, had a short period of rest and training
at Lesboeufs and Rocquigny before moving forward again on 5th
October to Equancourt. There, two days later, it heard the official