Page 461 - The-History-of-the-Lancashire-Fusiliers-1914-1918-Volume-I

Basic HTML Version

428
THE LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS, 1914-19I8
Its losses had been 3 officers and 83 other ranks; its captures were
about I20 prisoners, 4 4.2-inch guns, a signal wagon and several
machine guns; and its rewards were:-
Distinguished Service Order
Captain P. D. W. Dunn. M.C.
Military Cross
Second-Lieutenant F . C. Morgan.
Bar to Military l\fedal
Serjeant W. Ashworth. M.M.
Serjeant A. Braithwaite. M.M.
Military Medal
Company Serjeant-Major A. E. Miner.
Company Serjeant-Major F. Clements.
Se~jeant
J.
H. Fox.
Lance-Corporal H. Haberfield.
Pnvate A. Curry.
Private F. E. Mason.
Private A. Oseman.
Private
J .
Ricks.
Private
J.
Shackleton .
Private
J .
W. Williams.
With the exception of a comparatively small share in an attack
between St. Louis and Ooteghem, on the way from the River Lys to
the River Scheldt, on 22nd October, the fight near Ledeghem proved
to be the last
in
which the Ist Battalion took part .
A FINE FINISH
BY
THE 23RD BATTALloi
23
RD
BN .
The youngest of the family, the 23rd Battalion (Major
J.
P. M.
Ingham, D.S.O., in temporary command), was not left out of the
chase. Having enjoyed a fortnight's rest after its mixed fortunes at
Pont de Nieppe at the end of September, it moved into support
behind the line at Armentieres on I3th October. Next day there
were signs that the enemy intended to retire-not a surprising
decision in view of the events farther north which have been
described in the last few pages. The 23rd Battalion advanced
through the front-line troops and the old British front line east of
Armentieres on 16th October and tried to gain touch with the
Germans, who were by then withdrawing rapidly. By the early
morning of I8th October the battalion reached Croix-au-Bois, some
three miles north-east of Armentieres, to find cross-roads and
bridges blown up. After a day's rest, the battalion was off again and
made Wambrechies, three miles north of Lille, at midday. A delay
ensued as the canal bridge had been destroyed and the troops had
to get down to water level by step-ladders, cross on rafts and clamber
up the steep bank on the other side, encouraged by crowds of cheering
children who lined the towpath. But by 2 p.m. the battalion, tired
and hungry, moved on again through enthusiastic demonstrations
of gratitude from more of the freed inhabitants, reaching Croix, a
mile or so south-west of Roubaix, after another difficult canal
crossing the same evening. They went into support at Holden
Works, Croix. There, to their great disappointment, they were
squeezed out by other formations more suited to rapid and strenuous
pursuit, though they took their share in holding the line during