Page 464 - The-History-of-the-Lancashire-Fusiliers-1914-1918-Volume-I

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1918:
AUGUST TO THE ARMISTICE
43
1
too heavy for them. Later in the night he took out a patrol and
discovered that the Germans had skilfully hidden a machine-gun
post in a haystack. As he could not get at the post to attack it, he
set fire to the stack and opened a brisk fire on the two officers and
fifty other ranks who emerged from it, hitting a number of them.
This action enabled not only "D" Company to gain its objective but
a unit on the flank to get forward and gain touch with the 2nd/5th.
By dawn all objectives had been taken: the battalion had advanced
7,000 yards in two days at a cost of under thirty casualties and had
covered twelve miles in four days.
After a few days' rest the battalion was again in the outpost line
near Tournai. At 1.30 p.m. on 25th October it launched a small
attack on a factory at Ere, a mile and a quarter south-west of
that town, where a German strong point was situated. This was
taken, with three prisoners; but soon after, a company of Germans
counter-attacked and retook the building. The 2nd/5th men were
cut off and had to fight their way out, with a loss of thirty all ranks.
The following honours were awarded for the period 16th to 25th
October :-
Distinguished Service Order
Captain
J.
R.
Bodington, M.C.
Military Cros s
Second-Lieutenant
J.
Ferguson.
Second-Lieutenant E. G. V. Righton.
Second-Lieutenant]. Wake.
Distinguished Conduct Medal
Serjeant F. W. Harrison, :\1.M.
Serjeant W. F. Rowe.
Military Medal
Corporal
J.
Barker.
Lance-Corporal
J.
P. Ward .
Private S. Kay.
Lance-Corporal W. T. Brierley.
Private W. E. Cox.
Private A. Ralphson.
Private A. Warhurst.
THE
LAST
ROUND
1st/5th, 2nd/5th, 6th, 1st/7th, 1st/8th, 10th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th
Battalions
The Battle of the Sambre
lOth, 15th and 16th Battalions
By now it was evident that the German Empire was beaten.
The preoccupation of the Allied higher command was to prevent the
enemy from making such a stand during the winter months as would
enable him to negotiate armistice terms as an equal.
It
was therefore
decided to launch a big and decisive attack on a wide front early in
November, 1918, with the object of piercing his centre, disrupting his
communications with the north and south, and turning his with–
drawal into a rout. One French and three British Armies were to be
used to drive towards the general line Hirson-Maubeuge-Mons.