Page 84 - The-History-of-the-Lancashire-Fusiliers-1914-1918-Volume-I

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GALLIPOLI-SECOND AND THIRD BATTLES OF KRITHIA
67
Distinguished Conduct .Yfedal
Company Serjeant-Major B. Allister, 1st/6th.
Lance-Corporal S . Wild, 1st/5th.
Private
R.
Alien, 1st/6th.
Private
R.
Bateson, 1st/5th.
Private H. Butterworth, 1st/6th.
Private
R.
Casey, 1st/7th.
Private
J.
W . Child, 1st/6th.
Private W. Downton, 1st/7th.
Private A. Farnworth, 1st/8th.
Private W. Prince , 1st/ 7th.
Private G. Stewart, 1st/5th .
THE ACTION OF GULLY RAVINE
28th
June,
1915
1
st
Battalion
Gully Spur and Gully Ravine were to prove scarcely less
disastrous to the 1st Battalion on 28th June, 1915, than they had on
4th June. Since that ill-fated day, the French had magnificently
retrieved their failure; and the Commander-in-Chief decided to take
early advantage of their success on 21st June by capturing certain
key positions on Gully Spur and to the east of Gully Ravine whose
possession had been shown to be necessary before any advance on
the coveted Achi Baba could be made. The 29th Division were to
push forward along Gully Spur, taking Turkish trenches known as
" J 9," "J 10," "J
II,"
"J 12" and "J 13" ; while the 52nd (Lowland)
Division were to capture trenches known as "H 12" and "H 13" on
the east of Gully Ravine.
If
both attacks were completely successful,
a considerable gap would exist between the inner flanks of the two
divisions across the ravine.
The task of the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers (Major
C.
Bromley in
1ST BN.
temporary command) was to fill this gap, the battalion orders going
rather further than the brigadier's instructions in stating that the
firing line was to entrench on the east side of the ravine. To do this
involved passing diagonally through the leading units of the brigade
after the capture of the first objective-"J 9," "J 10" and "J
II"-
and swinging to the right while other units advanced straight up the
spur to the final objective-"J 12" and "J 13." All ranks were to
wear between their shoulders a triangular piece of biscuit tin which,
by reflecting the sun, would indicate to the artillery and others in
rear the position reached by the leading troops . This device was the
origin of the red triangle which later became the divisional sign of the
29th Division. For its intended purpose it was almost useless, as it
continued to reflect the sun even when its wearer had been killed
and his companions driven back.
The date chosen for the attack was 28th June, which proved to
be a day of intense heat. At 9 a .m. a heavy bombardment was
opened.
It
provoked an accurate Turkish reply which caused
casualties in the ranks of the battalion as it moved along the mule
track at the foot of the cliff by the sea from its bivouacs in West
Gully Beach towards its rendezvous at Y Ravine, as it did at
10.15 a.m. after receiving from Major Bromley a stirring address
which was warmly applauded.
It
then advanced up the narrow and