Page 94 - The-History-of-the-Lancashire-Fusiliers-1914-1918-Volume-I

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GALLIPOLI-SUVLA-EGYPT AND SINAI
77
ANOTHER PART OF THE HOLDING ATTACK
1st Battalion
While the Battle of the Vineyard was raging, the 29th Division
had also been taking part in the holding attack, between Krithia
Nullah and Gully Ravine. Here too the Turks put up a fierce
resistance; here too the attack as a whole was unsuccessful; and
here too the Turks were not content to remain on the defensive but
counter-attacked.
It
was to help
in
dealing with a Turkish counter–
attack which had obtained a footing in "Hampshire Cut," about
three hundred yards east of Gully Ravine, that the 1st Lancashire
1ST BN .
Fusiliers were called upon early on 7th August to send up two
companies, "A" and "B." They supported the Royal Dublin
Fusiliers in ejecting the Turks, but suffered heavy casualties. In the
days following the action, Lance-Corporal C. McGinn won the Dis–
tinguished Conduct Medal by crawling out under heavy fire with
water to a wounded man, being wounded himself in so doing, and
later leading a party of volunteers to bring in the dead and collect
the arms of casualties.
ANOTHER GALLANT ATTEMPT AT SUVLA
"SCIMITAR HILL"
1st and 9th Battalions
The position
in
which the troops were left at the end of the
fighting immediately following the landing at Suvla Bay could not
be regarded as satisfactory.
It
was therefore decided to launch a
new attack on 21st August, 1915, to capture a line running from
south to north from the "W" Hills to Scimitar Hill, both about two
and a half miles inland, as a safeguard for the future. The nth
Division, containing the 9th Battalion, was to take "W" Hills and
the 29th, containing the 1st Battalion,
Hill
II2 and Scimitar Hill.
The attack was timed for the afternoon so that the sun should be
behind the British troops, help their artillery and blind the Turks.
Unfortunately, unusual banks of cloud rolled up soon after midday ;
and the Turkish positions were hidden in a haze, for it was a very hot
day. A bombardment opened along the whole front of attack at
2.30 p.m., but proved of little value.
The 9th Battalion (Major M. C. Ferrers-Guy), with the 5th
9TH BN.
Dorsetshire Regiment, was ordered to seize some trenches four
hundred and fifty yards to their front .
It
had only seven officers.
One platoon, under Lieutenant A. Parke, was ordered to advance
during the bombardment, to seize favourable ground as near as
possible to the Turkish line with a view to helping the Dorsetshire,
and to enable the latter to fire at the Turks if they retired. A patrol
under a serjeant was ordered to keep
in
touch with the 2nd/ lOth
Gurkha Rifles on the right. As soon as the advance began at